Plant

Cymbidium Orchid – Propagation, Care, and Problems

Cymbidium generally known as boat orchids is a sort of evergreen blossoming plant in the orchid family Orchidaceae. Orchids in this family are epiphytic, lithophytic, earthbound, or seldom leafless saprophytic spices generally with pseudobulbs.

There are as a rule somewhere in the range of three and twelve leaves organized in two positions on every pseudobulb or shoot and going on for quite a long time. The word Cymbidium comes from Greek. The Greek word for ‘boat’ is ‘kymbos’ and the word Cymbidium is derived from that.

The lip of the bloom seems to be a boat which is the way the Cymbidium gets its name! From one to countless blossoms are organized on an unbranched blooming stem emerging from the foundation of the pseudobulb. The sepals and petals are liberated from and like one another.

The labellum is fundamentally not the same as different petals and sepals and has three flaps. There are around 55 species and sixteen further normal mixtures happening in the wild from tropical and subtropical Asia to Australia. Cymbidiums are notable in cultivation and numerous cultivars have been created.

The historical backdrop of scaled Cymbidium returns to 1900. During this period, the English brought over the principal Cymbidium plants from the Himalayas in Asia. They began to cross them and progressively more assortments and varieties were created.

These days there are more than 1,000 assortments of Cymbidium accessible throughout the entire year, with a stockpile top in fall and winter. The Himalayan scene comprises principally of rocks and it can chill off impressively around evening time. Regardless of its tropical appearance, the Cymbidium isn’t a sun admirer.

Fortunately, the blossoms are vigorous, and, surprisingly, in such cruel circumstances, they can flaunt their flawlessly shaded blossoms! Cymbidium can in any case be tracked down in the wild in Australia and Asia; in nations like Nepal, Vietnam, and Taiwan[1]Pal, R., et al., Cymbidium: botany, production, and uses. Orchids phytochemistry, biology, and horticulture: fundamentals and applications, 2019: p. 1-37. Read.

Cymbidium orchid
Image Source: Cymbidium.info

General plant description

Plants related to Cymbidium orchid are epiphytic, lithophytic, earthly plants, or seldom leafless saprophytes. All are sympodial evergreen spices. A few animal groups have flimsy stems however in many species the stems are changed as pseudobulbs. At the point when present, there are from three to twelve leaves organized in two positions and keep going for a considerable length of time.

The leaf bases stay after the leaf has shriveled, shaping a sheath around the pseudobulb. The blossoms are organized on an unbranched blooming stem which emerges from the foundation of the pseudobulb or seldom from a leaf axil. The sepals and petals are normally slight and beefy, free from, and that’s only the tip of the iceberg or less like one another.

The labellum (as in different orchids, an exceptionally changed third petal) is essentially not the same as different petals and sepals. It is at times pivoted to the section or generally intertwined to it. The labellum has three projections, the side flaps erect, in some cases encompassing the segment, and the center flap frequently bending downwards. After fertilization, a glabrous container containing many light-shaded seeds is delivered. Cymbidium orchid, (variety Cymbidium), likewise called boat orchid, sort of 50-70 types of tropical and subtropical orchids (family Orchidaceae)[2]Pan, R.C., Q.S. Ye, and C.S. Hew, Physiology of Cymbidium sinense: a review. Scientia horticulturae, 1997. 70(2-3): p. 123-129. Read.

The variety is circulated in Asia, however, a few animal categories are local to northern Australia. The orchids are well known as flower specialists’ plants and ornamentals, and there are a few thousand green halves and halves. The plants are known for their gaudy blossoms, which range from white and light yellow to green, maroon, and dull bronze, and can endure for a long time.

The cut blossoms are additionally genuinely durable and are normally utilized in corsages. Cymbidium species are evergreen and fill in soil or epiphytically on different plants. Most have short pseudobulbs (bulblike stem bases), strap-like weathered leaves, and many blossoms on each bloom tail. The waxy petals and sepals are commonly about a similar size and a similar variety, while the conspicuous labellum (lip) frequently includes a differentiating tone. The blossoms of certain species are fragrant[3]Nayak, N.R., M. Tanaka, and J. Teixeira da Silva, Biotechnology of Cymbidium overview of recent progress and future opportunities. Floriculture, ornamental and plant biotechnology: advances and … Continue reading.

Symbolic value of Cymbidium orchid

Cymbidium represents unadulterated, esteemed, and regarded fellowship. The demonstration of offering the bloom is viewed as a distinction as well as getting it. It is business as usual that the rose is a well-known gift for good companions in China.

The bloom likewise represents profound quality and righteousness. The Cymbidium gets some additional imagery from the orchid genealogy. In antiquated Greece, orchids represented manliness and ripeness. Afterward, the blossoms were lauded all the more profoundly in Europe for their excellence, strength, and opulence[4]Lee, S.-S., A review of orchid mycorrhizae in Korea. The Plant Pathology Journal, 2002. 18(4): p. 169-178. Read.

Kinds of Cymbidium orchids

All cymbidium orchids, or any orchid so far as that is concerned, are no doubt perfect.

  • Standard cymbidium orchids – This kind of cymbidium orchid alludes to the huge bloomed assortments, generally from the Himalayas and China.
  • Scaled-down and minimized cymbidium orchids – As the name proposes, these kinds of cymbidiums are more modest, commonly developing to the greatest level of one to three feet tall max.
  • Flowing cymbidium orchids – Like a botanical cascade, flowing cymbidium orchids are scene-stealers with spikes that can grow up to 30 inches[5]Lee, N. and C. Lee. Growth and flowering of Cymbidium ensifolium var. misericors as influenced by temperature. in II International Symposium on the Development of New Floricultural Crops 337. 1991. … Continue reading.

Cymbidium orchid varieties

Here are some examples of popular cymbidium orchid species:

1. Cymbidium erytrhostylum

This is a particular and rich Cymbidium type of moderate size. The leaves are around 18″ long and the general plant level is 18 to 20″ tall. This species is endemic to Vietnam where it develops at rises around 5000 ft. The blossoms are around 1.25″ wide with 4 to 8 for each inflorescence.

The sepals are wide and level while the petals cover the section and guide forward giving and by and large three-sided appearance toward the extremely enduring blossoms[6]An, S.K., et al., Efficient water management for cymbidium grown in coir dust using a soil moisture sensor-based automated irrigation system. Agronomy, 2020. 11(1): p. 41. Read.

Cymbidium erytrhostylum
Image Source: Marniturkel

2. Canalliculatum ‘Krull-Smith’

Cymbidium canaliculatum, usually known as the diverted boat-lip orchid, tiger boat-lip orchid, local cymbidium, or tiger orchid is a plant in the orchid family and is endemic to Australia. It is a cluster-shaping epiphyte with huge, grayish-green pseudobulbs, each with up to six bent, profoundly directed surrenders and to sixty fragrant, dynamically shaded blossoms that frequently have spots and blotches and a white to cream-shaded labellum with red markings. This orchid as a rule fills in the forks or hollows of trees and is found from New South Wales toward the northern pieces of Western Australia[7]Setyarini, A.A.Y., et al., World Journal of Advanced Research and Reviews. 2020. Read.

Cymbidium canaliculatum
By sunoochi from Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan – Cymbidium canaliculatum R.Br., Prodr. Fl. Nov. Holland.: 331 (1810), CC BY 2.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=90410791

3. Ensifolium ‘Iron Bone’

Cymbidium ensifolium is a wonderful little animal type from Japan, China, and Southeast Asia where it develops as a lithophyte and an earthly. The ‘Iron Bone’ plant is a pale-skinned person assortment with one-inch blossoms and a brilliant new scent[8]Vitale, G., Chinese folklore. 1896. Read.

Cymbidium ensifolium
Image Source: Orchids Forum

4. Eburneum ‘Vistamont’

It ranges from small to medium measured, hot to cool developing epiphyte or periodic lithophyte with grouped, ovoid to fusiform, reciprocally straightened pseudo bulbs encompassed basally by a few imbricating leaf bases conveying 9 to 17, distichous. It has a long inflorescence with 1 to 2, fragrant [lilacs], waxy, durable blossoms[9]Gogoi, K., S. Kumaria, and P. Tandon, Cryopreservation of Cymbidium eburneum Lindl. and C. hookerianum Rchb. f., two threatened and vulnerable orchids via encapsulation–dehydration. In Vitro … Continue reading.

Eburneum
Image Source: Flickr

5. Cymbidium aliciae

Blossoms are white and 5 cm wide with a few red spots on the lip somewhat fragrant. Inflorescence can grow up to 10 cm bearing around 10 blossoms. Cymbidium aliciae is named after Alicia, an American Orchid Enthusiast in the Philippines in 1900.

Cymbidium aliciae was tracked down in uneven regions from heights of 300 to 2750 meters. The plant is tracked down in obscure regions. It is endemic to the Philippines and is tracked down on Sulawesi and the Philippines on the island of Luzon, Negro Islands, and Nueva Vazcaya[10]Yukawa, T. and W.L. Stern, Comparative vegetative anatomy and systematics of Cymbidium (Cymbidieae: Orchidaceae). Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2002. 138(4): p. 383-419. Read.

Cymbidium aliciae
Image Source: Orchids Fandom

There are several other species too. Among these, Cymbidium defoliatum, Cymbidium lancifolium, Cymbidium aloifolium, Cymbidium atropurpureum, Cymbidium borneense, Cymbidium canaliculatum, and Cymbidium devonianum are on the top of the list and also count under famous varieties.

Propagation of Cymbidium orchid

Like most plants, orchids can repeat themselves in two unique ways; the one way physically by seed, and the other aquatically by vegetative proliferation. For the novice, vegetative engendering is generally used to develop one’s orchid assortment. Vegetative spread can be achieved in three ways; that is, by division, back bulbs, and branch-offs.

The strategy of each contrasts fundamentally in the method for delivering the new individual and in the early consideration. Cymbidium is a class of orchids that produces particular stems known as a pseudobulb. These bulbs are elongated designs that stretch out over the dirt in a cluster at the foundation of your orchid.

You can isolate these bulbs and re-pot them to create a few unmistakable plants. Cymbidium ordinarily has an external ring of pseudobulbs supporting leaves and an internal center of torpid pseudobulbs. You can propagate your cymbidium utilizing the pseudobulbs[11]Lee, Y.-I., Vegetative propagation of orchids, in Orchid propagation: from laboratories to greenhouses—methods and protocols. 2018, Springer. p. 403-425. Read.

Steps to follow:

  • Anticipate isolating your cymbidium in pre-summer after it has gotten done with blossoming. Count the number of pseudobulbs with leaves on your orchid and acquire sufficient plant pots to help three pseudobulbs per pot.
  • Set up a developing vehicle for your cymbidium divisions utilizing a combination of finely cut orchid bark chips estimating about 1/8 to 1/4 inch and perlite. Utilize a combination of 4 sections of bark chips to 1 section of perlite to make a very much depleted preparing blend for orchid seedlings.
  • Eliminate your cymbidium from its holder and slacken any dirt beyond the plant. Partition the external verdant pseudobulbs into bunches of three and delicately separate them where they join the adjoining pseudobulbs. Separate the roots connected to each bunch from your cymbidium’s root ball. Brush or shake free any old preparing blend connected to the roots. Try not to harm or cut off roots whenever the situation allows.
  • Add the prepared blend to the pot you arranged and place the foundations of your verdant cymbidium division on top of it.
  • Partition the pseudobulbs from the focal point of the plant into individual bulbs. Eliminate any roots or old leaf buds from the pseudobulbs and spot them in a cool and damp stockpiling region that is shielded from light.
  • The plant they grew pseudobulb in a little holder that is something like 2 inches more extensive than your bulb utilizing a fine preparing blend. Water the pseudobulb softly until the bulb starts to shape roots and new development.

Cymbidium orchid care

Light: Place in a south or east window. With the right lighting, leaves ought to be apple green rather than dull green. Cymbidiums need a serious level of light throughout the spring and summer; however, the higher temperatures during this period require some overshadowing. No concealing is expected throughout the fall and winter.
Watering: Cymbidiums are earthbound plants with a quick development rate, so water them oftentimes. Water it intensely during the development month’s spring before pre-fall. Keep the preparing medium sodden. Diminish watering in pre-fall. Keep scarcely sodden throughout the colder time of year.
Temperature Requirements: Daytime temperatures ought to be 75-80 degrees. Evening time temperatures ought to be at 55-60 degrees. During pre-fall and late summer, night temperatures ought to drop to 55 degrees to start bud spikes.
Moistness: In the colder time of year keep mugginess at 40-60%, particularly assuming the plants are sprouting.
Manure: during the development season (spring through pre-fall) utilize high-nitrogen manure. In the pre-fall, utilize a high phosphorus sprout supporter to assist with framing bloom spikes. Treat all set like clockwork in summer. In winter, treat one time per month.
Soil: Utilize an exceptional mix orchid blend containing bark. Bachman conveys fertilized soil explicitly produced for orchids.
Repotting: Repot in the spring, in the wake of blooming, like clockwork, or while preparing medium disintegrates. Select a pot that will consider something like 2-3 years of pseudobulb development before swarming the pot.
Grooming: Stake to get blossoms if necessary. Wipe leaves with a clammy fabric to clean[12]Bibeth, S. and J. Ajeya, Case Study: Need assessment, Pricing and Availability perceptions: A study of Cymbidium Orchids of Sikkim Himalayas. Advances in Management, 2015. 8(1): p. 26. Read.

Some common problems with Cymbidium orchid

If the plant has some issues related to sprouting it is advised to check for temperatures. Or there has been the utilization of a lot of manure. Orchids should have a 10 to 20-degree distinction between night and day temperatures. Diminish compost to 1/4 the suggested rate. Move to an area that offers all the more light.
If leaf tips are carmelizing it is advised to check strictly for watering ratio. It is also possible that there was low Humidity and an excessive amount of compost has been used. Water when the media is dry to the touch. Permit overabundance of water to deplete. Try not to permit the pot to sit in a saucer with water[13]Swett, C. and J. Uchida, Characterization of fusarium diseases on commercially grown orchids in Hawaii. Plant Pathology, 2015. 64(3): p. 648-654. Read.

References

References
1Pal, R., et al., Cymbidium: botany, production, and uses. Orchids phytochemistry, biology, and horticulture: fundamentals and applications, 2019: p. 1-37. Read
2Pan, R.C., Q.S. Ye, and C.S. Hew, Physiology of Cymbidium sinense: a review. Scientia horticulturae, 1997. 70(2-3): p. 123-129. Read
3Nayak, N.R., M. Tanaka, and J. Teixeira da Silva, Biotechnology of Cymbidium overview of recent progress and future opportunities. Floriculture, ornamental and plant biotechnology: advances and topical issues, 2006. 4: p. 558-562. Read
4Lee, S.-S., A review of orchid mycorrhizae in Korea. The Plant Pathology Journal, 2002. 18(4): p. 169-178. Read
5Lee, N. and C. Lee. Growth and flowering of Cymbidium ensifolium var. misericors as influenced by temperature. in II International Symposium on the Development of New Floricultural Crops 337. 1991. Read
6An, S.K., et al., Efficient water management for cymbidium grown in coir dust using a soil moisture sensor-based automated irrigation system. Agronomy, 2020. 11(1): p. 41. Read
7Setyarini, A.A.Y., et al., World Journal of Advanced Research and Reviews. 2020. Read
8Vitale, G., Chinese folklore. 1896. Read
9Gogoi, K., S. Kumaria, and P. Tandon, Cryopreservation of Cymbidium eburneum Lindl. and C. hookerianum Rchb. f., two threatened and vulnerable orchids via encapsulation–dehydration. In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology-Plant, 2013. 49(3): p. 248-254. Read
10Yukawa, T. and W.L. Stern, Comparative vegetative anatomy and systematics of Cymbidium (Cymbidieae: Orchidaceae). Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2002. 138(4): p. 383-419. Read
11Lee, Y.-I., Vegetative propagation of orchids, in Orchid propagation: from laboratories to greenhouses—methods and protocols. 2018, Springer. p. 403-425. Read
12Bibeth, S. and J. Ajeya, Case Study: Need assessment, Pricing and Availability perceptions: A study of Cymbidium Orchids of Sikkim Himalayas. Advances in Management, 2015. 8(1): p. 26. Read
13Swett, C. and J. Uchida, Characterization of fusarium diseases on commercially grown orchids in Hawaii. Plant Pathology, 2015. 64(3): p. 648-654. Read